AsthmaNet Studies for Adults

ALfA

Study Complete

ALendronate for Asthma

Bronchodilators are inhaled medicines that relax the muscles in the airway. This makes the airway bigger so it is easier to breathe. They also protect against airway narrowing when you are exposed to your asthma triggers. One type of bronchodilator is called a beta-2-agonist. Examples are albuterol and salmeterol.

When people take beta-2-agonist bronchodilators regularly, the medication may not protect as well against asthma triggers. This is referred to as loss of bronchoprotection.

Alendronate is a medication used to prevent and treat certain types of bone loss (osteoporosis). Studies suggest it may prevent the loss of bronchoprotection caused by regular use of beta-2-agonists. The purpose of the ALfA study is to find out if alendronate affects the loss of bronchoprotection in patients with asthma who are taking beta-2-agonists.

ALfA is currently enrolling participants ages 18 and older in the following areas:

Boston, MA
Chicago, IL
Denver, CO
Madison, WI
Pittsburgh, PA
Raleigh, NC
St. Louis, MO
San Francisco, CA
Tucson, AZ
Winston-Salem, NC

SIENA

Enrollment Complete

Steroids In Eosinophil Negative Asthma

Most people with asthma have inflammation in their airway. Asthma controller medications, like inhaled corticosteroids, are meant to reduce inflammation in the airway. Reducing airway inflammation should make one's breathing easier. However, many people with asthma don't breathe easier when they take an inhaled corticosteroid.

We know that there are several types of cells that can cause airway inflammation. However, inhaled corticosteroids mostly target only one cell called the eosinophil. The purpose of this study is to find out if people should take an asthma controller medication based on the type of inflammatory cells present in their airway. More details may be found on the clinicaltrials.gov website by clicking here.

SIENA is currently enrolling participants ages 12 and older in the following areas:

Atlanta, GA
Boston, MA
Chicago, IL
Cleveland, OH
Denver, CO
Durham, NC
Jacksonville, FL
Madison, WI
New York, NY
Orlando, FL
Pittsburgh, PA
Raleigh, NC
St. Louis, MO
San Francisco, CA
Tucson, AZ
Winston-Salem, NC

BARD

Study Complete

Best African American Response to Asthma Drugs

The purpose of this study is to find the best treatment to add for African American/Black people who have asthma that is not well controlled on a low dose of inhaled steroid. The BARD study will also try to find out if African American/Black adults and children differ in how they respond to the medications used in this study. This study is currently recruiting children, teens and adults ages 5 and older who have at least one African American/Black grandparent. More details may be found on the clinicaltrials.gov website by clicking here.

Study sites are located in the following areas; please note that not all sites accept both child and adult participants. Please contact the site for details by clicking on the city below:

Atlanta, GA
Boston, MA
Chicago, IL
Cleveland, OH
Denver, CO
Durham, NC
Madison, WI
Milwaukee, WI
New York, NY
Pittsburgh, PA
Raleigh, NC
St. Louis, MO
San Francisco, CA
Winston-Salem, NC

Microbiome

Study Complete

Airway and Gut Microbiome in Allergy and Asthma: Relationships to Immune and Clinical Phenotype. Effects of Inhaled Corticosteroid Treatment

The purpose of the Microbiome study is to examine microscopic organisms that are naturally present in various systems of the body, and their relationship to asthma and asthma treatment. More details may be found on the clinicaltrials.gov website by clicking here.

This study enrolled adults ages 18-60, both with and without asthma, in the following locations:

Boston, MA
Chicago, IL
Denver, CO
Madison, WI
Pittsburgh, PA
Raleigh, NC
St. Louis, MO
San Francisco, CA
Winston-Salem, NC

VIDA

Study Complete

VItamin D add-on therapy enhances corticosteroid responsiveness in Asthma

The purpose of this study is to find out if taking Vitamin D in addition to an inhaled steroid will help prevent worsening asthma symptoms and asthma attacks. More details may be found on the clinicaltrials.gov website by clicking here.

This study enrolled adults 18 years of age and older in the following locations:

Atlanta, GA
Boston, MA
Chicago, IL
Cleveland, OH
Denver, CO
Durham, NC
Madison, WI
Milwaukee, WI
Pittsburgh, PA
Raleigh, NC
St. Louis, MO
San Francisco, CA
Winston-Salem, NC
Asthmanet Studies
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